The Garden

The Garden

When Henry Francis du Pont embarked on his mission to create the gardens of Winterthur, he did so with spirited ardor. His studies of horticulture taught him color theory and succession-of-bloom principles that he steadfastly put into practice. The wild garden on the southern slope at the front of the house, now known as the March Bank, was where he first realized the garden's full potential. The border plantings of previous generations no longer restrained him as he saw the total Winterthur landscape as his canvas. With flower bulbs as his brushstrokes, he set off to create a masterpiece.

H. F. du Pont began his garden project in 1902. Blending nineteenth-century garden structures surrounded by white, pink, red, yellow, peach, and maroon blooms in the Peony Garden, the Azalea Woods carpeted in Spanish bluebells, the color experimentation that led to the symphony of simultaneous blossoms on Winterhazel Walk, the fragrant and lush shrubs in the Sundial Garden, the Quarry Garden mixture of textures of stone, leaves, and flower petals, as well as the saucer magnolias planted by his father, Henry Algernon du Pont, around 1880, Winterthur's rolling hills became so much more than a landscape. Henry Francis du Pont created a work of art that visitors can still see today.