Sku : 29294d

Rush Rose Pincushion Kit

Winterthur Licensed Product!
Price:
$22.50
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During the twentieth century, Henry du Pont acquired a large collection of American needlework. One of Winterthur's most beautiful samplers was worked by Elizabeth Rush of Philadelphia and is dated 1734. She worked her sampler at the school of Elizabeth and Ann Marsh. They taught needlework to some of the most prominent families of 18th century Philadelphia.

The Claret Red and Champagne Gold pincushions were inspired and adapted by a design element on the sampler. Both pincushions can be personalized with initials.

• Made in USA.

• Kit available in either Claret Red or Champagne tone of D.M.C floss, 35 count linen, polished cotton for the Claret Red pincushion, linen for the Champagne pincushion, needle, graphs, directions, floss to fashion the braided trim. Stuffing is not included.

• Embroidery technique: Cross Stitch and Satin Stitch.

• Gift Boxed.

• Each kit is made by hand, please allow 4-6 weeks for shipping.

• Gift wrapping is unavailable for this item. It is made to order and ships directly from the supplier.

Available
Each kit is made by hand, please allow 4-6 weeks for shipping. Gift wrapping is unavailable for this item. It is made to order and ships directly from the supplier.
One of the first things that girls were taught to make was a sampler, which recorded the different stitches they had learned, either from their mothers or from their teachers. One of Winterthur’s most beautiful samplers was worked by Elizabeth Rush of Philadelphia and is dated 1734. She worked her sampler at the school of Elizabeth Marsh and Ann Marsh, who taught needlework to girls from some of the most prominent families of 18th-century Philadelphia. Using cross, queen’s, satin, and whip stitches, Elizabeth Rush embroidered her design on a fine linen ground with multicolored silk yarns. The piece measures 18 ¼ inches high by 13 inches wide. The vinelike, cross-stitch border and embroidered bands of stylized flowers were very popular in the Philadelphia area at that time. Between the flowery bands, she added a selection of verses found in 17th-century homilies, designed to keep young people on the straight and narrow path. The inscription reads: The Bed Was Earth The Raised Pillar Stone Where on Poor Jacob Rested His Head & bones
Heaven Was His Canopy The Shades Of Night Was His Drawn Curtains To Exclude the light
This Poor State of Jacob as it seems to me his cattle found as soft a bed as he
Yet to his joy his God he found God is not always found in beds of down
See how the lillies flourish white and fair see how the ravens fed from heaven are
Then neer distrust thy god for cloth or bread whilst lillies flourish and the ravens fed
Oh thou great king of kings arise and rein except thy vertue springs all worships vain
Except thy quickning life be sett to rise theres none can offer up a sacrifice
That findes acceptance with so great a king and then who dare into presence bring
The blemished the maimed of the blind when with an earthy prince could never find
Any regard but rather for the same severe chastizement with rebuke and shame
O let thy holy power operate within thy temple thou immaculate 1734
She could not resist, however, adding at the bottom of her needlework a popular schoolgirl adage: “This work in hand my friends may have/When I am dead and laid in my grave/Elizabeth Rush * her work/ done * in * the * th * year * of * her *age.” It is thought that some of the versions are from Epigrams on Progress by John Hawkins of Boston.

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